Detect executable format using Python

In this article, I am sharing with you a small Python script that lets you detect if a file is an executable file and what platform the executable is targeting.

The following formats for 32 bits and 64bits processors are supported:

  • Mach-O files: both regular and universal formats
  • Windows PE files
  • Linux ELF files

The script

#---------------------------------------------------------------------
EXEFLAG_NONE        = 0x0000
EXEFLAG_LINUX       = 0x0001
EXEFLAG_WINDOWS     = 0x0002
EXEFLAG_MACOS       = 0x0004
EXEFLAG_MACOS_FAT   = 0x0008
EXEFLAG_32BITS      = 0x0010
EXEFLAG_64BITS      = 0x0020

# Keep signatures sorted by size
_EXE_SIGNATURES = (
    ("\x4D\x5A", EXEFLAG_WINDOWS),
    ("\xCE\xFA\xED\xFE", EXEFLAG_MACOS | EXEFLAG_32BITS),
    ("\xCF\xFA\xED\xFE", EXEFLAG_MACOS | EXEFLAG_64BITS),
    ("\xBE\xBA\xFE\xCA", EXEFLAG_MACOS | EXEFLAG_32BITS | EXEFLAG_MACOS_FAT),
    ("\xBF\xBA\xFE\xCA", EXEFLAG_MACOS | EXEFLAG_64BITS | EXEFLAG_MACOS_FAT),
    ("\x7F\x45\x4C\x46\x01", EXEFLAG_LINUX | EXEFLAG_32BITS),
    ("\x7F\x45\x4C\x46\x02", EXEFLAG_LINUX | EXEFLAG_64BITS)
)

def get_exeflags(filepath):
    try:
        with open(filepath, "rb") as f:
            buf = ""
            buf_len = 0
            for sig, flags in _EXE_SIGNATURES:
                sig_len = len(sig)
                if buf_len < sig_len:
                    buf += f.read(sig_len - buf_len)
                    buf_len = sig_len

                if buf == sig:
                    return flags
    except:
        pass

    return EXEFLAG_NONE

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7 DLL injection techniques in Microsoft Windows

In this article, I am going to list half a dozen DLL injection techniques that can be used by a user mode process running on MS Windows. There could be more techniques but I am sharing with you the techniques that I had first hand experience with.

1. AppInit_DLLs

People used to rely on the AppInit_DLLs registry key. The OS loader queries this value and loads the DLLs specified there when a process is created. I have not used this technique in a long while (last time I used it was on Windows XP) and I heard it is now restricted or discontinued because it was widely used by malware.

2. SetWindowsHookEx API

The SetWindowsHookEx API installs an application-defined hook procedure into a given hook chain. There are various supported hook chains (CBT, Journal, Window messages, keyboard, mouse, etc).

When using the SetWindowsHookEx API, you are instructing the operating system to inject your custom hook DLL into other process where it is relevant. The Windows hooks work when the other processes import / use functionality from USER32.dll.

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Introduction to writing x86 assembly code in Visual Studio

Hello,

In this technical blog post, I am going to give you a head start on how to write assembler code and compile it directly from the Visual Studio IDE.

If you are interested in x64, please check this article.

image

You are expected to be familiar with:

  • The Intel x86 assembly language and writing basic assembly code
  • Understanding of various calling conventions (stdcall, cdecl and fastcall)

Okay, let’s get started! Continue reading

Preparing for the Washington State Driving Test

Hello,

Today I am going to share with you some of the notes I compiled / prepared when I had to study in order to pass the driving test.

These notes are not comprehensive and may contain mistakes, please double check what you study while reading from the Washington Driver Guide Continue reading