Batchography: Changing the MAC address on Windows – A free Batch script

batchography-good-resIn a previous post entitled “How to get unlimited free Internet at Airports“, I showed you how to circumvent the time limit imposed by the “free” Wi-Fi connections in certain airports.

For that trick to work, you were required to update the MAC address of your computer each time the free time is over.

In this blog post, I am going to share with you the ChangeMACAddressBatch script that I wrote with the help and instructions from the excellent Batchography book.

The script makes use of various recipes illustrated in the Batchography book (in Chapter 4) and uses the various Batch scripting language syntax (Chapters 1 and 2) and methodologies (Chapter 3). Therefore, I will not be explaining the script’s contents or how it works because it will become evident if you read the Batchography book.

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How to use the script interactively

To begin with, you need to run the script with administrative privileges.

Running the script as an administrator


On Windows 8 and above, just press Win+X and choose “Command Prompt (Admin)” like this:

chg-mac-run-elevated-command-prompt

Otherwise, if you are using the Windows Explorer window, then right-click on your script and choose “Run as Administrator”:

chg-mac-run-as-admin

Starting the script

When you first run the script, you will be presented with the main menu that will show you a list of all the adapters you have on your system.

On my laptop for instance, I have 4 adapters:

  • An Ethernet adapter
  • 2 x VMWare virtual adapters
  • A Wi-Fi adapter

Using the keyboard, type the adapter number that you want to inspect and/or change its MAC address:

chg-mac-main-menu

Let’s press “4” in this case and go inside that adapter’s information screen. Continue reading

Keyboard shortcuts to work in a remote desktop Windows Machine from your MacBook

macos-rdp-1In this blog post, I am going to share with you how to get the missing keyboard keys that let you work in MS Windows via the remote desktop client under Mac OS X with the MacBook’s keyboard.

What is important to know is that when using a MacBook’s keyboard, you don’t have all the keys that you usually have on a PC keyboard.

Essentially, you are missing the following keys:

  • HOME / END.
  • DEL key. This is different from the MacBook’s “Delete” key (which is equivalent to the “Backspace” key).
  • INS Key.
  • Page Up / Page Down.
  • The “Windows” key.

Continue reading

WifiPasswordReveal: A script to reveal all the saved WiFi passwords in Windows 7 and above

Hello,

The “How to show saved Windows 7 Wifi passwords” turned out to be a popular article and to make the life of my readers easier, I decided to apply a newly acquired knowledge and write a tool to make it SUPER EASY to get all the saved WiFi passwords without needing administrative privileges and without having to click through various settings dialogs.

Note: In some cases, if the script fails to run, then you may want to run the script as administrator.

Read on! Continue reading

Enable and use Bash under Windows 10

linux-subsystem-bash-coming-to-windows

Starting from Windows 10 build 14316 you will be able to use Bash from Windows, with the Ubuntu flavor without running a VM.

Bash will run natively on the OS without virtualization. It is implemented as new Windows subsystem.

In this article I will show you all the required steps to get Bash up and running in Windows 10! Continue reading

Backup and restore NTFS files permission with the ResetPermission utility

This is a follow up article to the popular article Resetting NTFS files permission in Windows – Graphical Utility.

In this article, I document the new feature in the ResetPermissions utility v1.1.5, where you can now backup and restore the NTFS files permissions. Continue reading

Introduction to writing x64 assembly in Visual Studio

asm64helloThis article completes the previous article about writing x86 assembly code in Visual Studio. Therein, I will show you how to extend the previous knowledge and give you a head start on how to write x64 assembler code instead. Continue reading