Take aways from the Defensive Driving Course

Recently, I took the 6 session defensive driving course. The following are some of the notes I extracted from the course that I would like to share with my you:

There were lots of information in the course, I highly recommend taking it! You can download the notes as a single PDF file from here:

(The PDF was created using the free Pic2Pdf tool)

The defensive driving formula


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Batchography: Converting numbers to characters (or the CHR() function)

In various programming languages, you might sometimes need to convert numbers to characters. In simple terms, each character you see has a numerical representation. The ASCII table  shows the numbers of each character and its corresponding glyph.

Converting numbers to their corresponding characters would be useful to generate a random string for instance. The first step to generating a random string is to generate random numbers between 65 and 90 (upper case ‘A’ to upper case ‘Z’) or between 97 and 122 (lower case ‘a’ to lower case ‘z’).

While the Batch language is pretty primitive, you would be surprised how many things you can do with it. In the Batchography book, I cover various topics that would bring your Batch programming skills to the next level.
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Batchography: How to do a Switch/case in Batch files

You have found this blog post because you are wondering if there is a way to express a “switch/case” logic in Batch files.

The short answer is NO, not exactly. However, there are ways to achieve the same in Batch files.

In the Batchography book, I explain in details the “switch/case” construct, but in this blog post I will illustrate this mechanism briefly. For more advanced Batch scripting topics, please grab a copy of the Batchography book.

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MacBook keyboard keys

In this blog post, I am going to share with you how to get the lacking keyboard keys on a MacBook’s keyboard.

Essentially, you are missing the following keys:

  • HOME / END.
  • DEL key. This is different from the MacBook’s “Delete” key (which is equivalent to the “Backspace” key).
  • Page Up / Page Down.

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Batchography: How to do string substitution in the Batch scripting language?

There are so many undocumented or obscure features in the Batch scripting language and in this article I am going to illustrate how to do string substitution.

For more advanced Batch scripting topics, please grab a copy of the Batchography book.

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Batchography – Programming the “Hangman game” using the Batch scripting language!

hangman-1In this blog post, I am going to share with you the high level steps needed to build the Hangman game using the Batch scripting language.

To learn more about how the Hangman is programmed using the Batch scripting language, please refer to Chapter 5 in the Batchography book.

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  • or the e-book editionbtn-buy-on-amazon

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3 easy steps to setting up a zero configuration multi-platform web server with NodeJS and local-web-server

In this technical post I am going to illustrate how you can use the simple local-web-server package for NodeJS to start your web server in a few commands.

Let’s get started!

Step 1 – Installation

First, install NodeJS from http://nodejs.org/download/

If you are using Windows, then make sure you download the MSI package because it is so easy to install.

Keep the default options as you’re installing:

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After installing NodeJS, open an elevated command prompt (i.e: run cmd.exe as Administrator) and type the following command in order to install the local-web-server package:

npm install -g local-web-server

You should see something like this:

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No errors imply that the package has been successfully installed! Continue reading